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What Is Self-Esteem?

self-talk is in the way


Some Definitions of Self-Esteem: the New Name for Ego

  • Ego will help you to recognize, remove, and replace your ego: a.k.a. self-esteem.

Organized Alphabetically

  • Ego is the phony self, a delusion in Eastern psychology, and your spiritual enemy in Western traditions.
  • High self-esteem is sadism, and low self-esteem is masochism.
  • Self -esteem is when you delusionally identify with your images of family, friends, groups, gods, and the like.
  • Self-Esteem is a delusion since no one is or can be a comparison, and self-esteem is self as comparisons.
  • Self-esteem is a polite name for the mindless mental-chatter about what you are that devours your day.
  • Self-esteem is a superiority complex.
  • Self-esteem is attaching to ego pleasure and detaching from ego pain.
  • Self-esteem is chimera chasing.
  • Self-esteem is fear of opinion.
  • Self-esteem is an inner debate about what to put on your tombstone.
  • Self-esteem is self as comparisons.
  • Self-esteem is self as thought.
  • Self-esteem is self-idolatry.
  • Self-esteem is the battle to attach to pride and to detach from shame.
  • Self-esteem is the creation of self as your own personal Frankenstein monster.
  • Self-esteem is the death of self as something and the disintegration of that thing as more things.
  • Self-esteem is the delusional process of your seeking to become something, to die as thought.
  • Self-esteem is the dualistic battle between wanting always to feel superior and still winding up feeling inferior.
  • Self-esteem is the duality of inferior and superior falsely applied to self.
  • Self-esteem is the duality of pride and shame.
  • Self-esteem is the experience of either ego pleasure or ego pain.
  • Self-esteem is the fight-or-flight response to danger for ego and the seeking of safety for ego.
  • Self-esteem is the game of hiding shame with pride.
  • Self-esteem is the modern name for ego.
  • Self-esteem is the mummification of the self.
  • Self-esteem is the name for the game of what things you should and should not be.
  • Self-esteem is the opposite principle from the principles of equality and
  • Self-esteem is the path of death as things.
  • Self-esteem is the practice of taxidermy upon the living.
  • Self-esteem is the practice of those who worship the god of opinion.
  • Self-esteem is the prideful, self-righteous, and false process of seeking self as knowing, doing, and being.
  • Self-esteem is the process of encasing and enclosing the identity in self-protective thoughts.
  • Self-esteem is the process of identifying the self with things, thoughts, and traits until the self is forgotten and lost.
  • Self-esteem is the process of inner conflict in which you try to do the humanly impossible: to transform the bad into the good.
  • Self-esteem is the royal road to death and destruction.
  • Self-esteem is the seeking of ego pleasure and the avoidance of ego pain.
  • Self-esteem is the self-centered activity of creating your own Frankenstein monster from the dead bodies of other egos.
  • Self-esteem is the way of attachment.
  • Self-esteem is when you are foolishly worried about being good or bad instead of doing good or bad.
  • Self-esteem is when you are high (pride) when you compare your self as better and low (shame) when you compare your self as worse.
  • Self-esteem is when you irrationally identify with your behaviors and beliefs.
  • Self-esteem is when you think you are good for doing good and bad for doing bad.
  • Self-esteem is your collection of your superior and inferior comparisons of your self, with your imagined selves for others, based on your imagined experiences for others.
  • Self-esteem is your wanting to appear good and to avoid appearing bad.

Quotations from Various Sources

Organized Alphabetically

“Guilt is really the reverse side of the coin of pride. Guilt aims at self-destruction, and pride aims at the destruction of others.” —Bill W., As Bill Sees It, p. 140 

“Is self-esteem a sickness? That’s according to the way you define it. In the usual way it is defined by people and by psychologists, I’d say that it is probably the greatest emotional disturbance known to man and woman.” —Albert Ellis, The Myth of Self-Esteem: How Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Can Change Your Life Forever, p. 13 

“Self-esteem exists as the interdependent duality of pride and shame.” —Kevin Everett FitzMaurice 

“Self-esteem steals souls.” —Kevin Everett FitzMaurice 

“When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom.” —Proverbs 11:2 



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